8 comments


    1. Post author
      Jules

      Thanks for taking the time to comment, I am glad you enjoyed the article. I have to say it was a bit nerve wracking being the interviewee after being the interviewer for so long!

  1. Mark Big

    Nobody has mentioned the obvious. Most girls and older women go to Jamaica for sex. Nothing wrong with that but its funny how its often masked with ‘setting up a charity’ or a ‘new country experience’.


    1. Post author
      Jules

      Hey Mark
      Thanks for taking the time to comment… But, I have to say your comment made me laugh, in that you assume that MOST women (and why would you even mention girls?) actually come to Jamaica just to get their leg over and disguise it as coming here to do charity work! DWL!! I wonder where you get your assumptions from about this? Also, I can only assume that as the comment was made off the back of my post about moving to Jamaica, that you also imply this to myself too? I find this amusing and a little disconcerting as you have never met me and whilst Jamaican men can be very sexy and full of sweet talk, there is a lot more going on for me, them and the island in general, for my moving here to be based on sex alone. What I would say is that whilst many holiday makers, male and female, come abroad for some ‘fun in the sun’ it is not indicative of a visit to Jamaica alone, as it goes on all over the world (Costa Brava or Spring Break anyone?!). Maybe one day these sex starved women and girls that you talk about will make South Africa their shagging destination and you will get a piece of the pie, but until then why not visit Jamaica and see if your perceptions about the island change?

  2. Tia

    Well written post – Thankyou. Very informative as I’m wanting to move very soon too. In every main area is there an expact community? And is there a particular area that many brits move to in jamaica?


    1. Post author
      Jules

      Hi Tia and welcome to the site.

      Thank you for taking the time to leave a comment, I am glad the post was useful to you. I would say that expats tend me spread themselves wide and far all across the country, sometimes simply living where they love the view. But many will live in housing schemes / gated communities that are dotted around the busier areas. The north coast towns of Ocho Rios and Montego Bay and surrounds are popular, as is the south coast if you prefer a more tourist zone free type of coastline to mooch about on.

      Wherever you live it is always advisable to come to the area several times, and stay over if possible before making the commitment to buy or build your dream home. I wish you good luck with your move though wherever you decide to settle.

      Bless up Jules

  3. Amy

    Hey Jules, are you still in Jamaica? I’d love to move there but the high levels of crime are making me think twice….
    I guess you feel completely safe otherwise you wouldn’t be there. Have you ever encountered either feeling or being in danger whilst on the beautiful island?

    Amy


    1. Post author
      Jules

      Hey Amy!

      Welcome to the site and thanks for taking the time to join the conversation…

      I am still living in Jamaica and I do for the most part I feel safe doing so. I know it is a cliche, but the reality is no-where is completely safe and we always need to be aware of the unexpected in our surroundings. Growing up in London, UK you had to have ‘street sense’ to keep yourself out of sticky situations and I still use many of those principles over here. Along with some others I have garnered along the way that specifically help me get by with the cultural differences in Jamaica!

      In terms of moving and living in Jamaica for an extended period of time, I wouldn’t say don’t come because of the crime level. I would say to be very aware of it.

      Many people feel comfortable and ‘safer’ living in a gated scheme or community. OK, it doesn’t keep you wrapped up in cotton wool, but there is often security at the gate which makes it more unlikely that you will be a victim of crime in the home.

      When going about your daily business over here, there are the obvious ones like staying away from potentially volatile areas, not flashing cash and expensive items, avoiding walking alone at night and so on. But there are also more subtle things, like keeping yourself out of other people’s business and being cautious of who you trust and who you start relationships with.

      Take care for now. Bless up Jules

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